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The ethics of abortion : women's rights, human life, and the question of justice

Author: Christopher Robert Kaczor
Publisher: New York : Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2015.
Series: Routledge annals of bioethics.
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : Second editionView all editions and formats
Summary:
"Appealing to reason rather than religious belief, this book is the most comprehensive case against the choice of abortion yet published. This updated edition of The Ethics of Abortion critically evaluates all the major grounds for denying fetal personhood, including the views of those who defend not only abortion but also post-birth abortion. It also provides several (non-theological) justifications for the  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Christopher Robert Kaczor
ISBN: 9780415732925 0415732921 9780415732932 041573293X
OCLC Number: 883510600
Description: xviii, 280 pages ; 23 cm.
Contents: 1. Introduction --
How should we talk about abortion? --
Loaded language --
Women and abortion --
Moral goodness and human flourishing --
1. Is after-birth abortion ethically permissible? --
After-birth abortion : why should the baby live? --
A case against after-birth abortion --
Other arguments for infanticide --
A critique of arguments for infanticide --
A critique of Neo-Lockean personhood --
Seriously ill newborns --
Arbitrary limits and absurd consequences --
3. Does personhood begin at birth? --
Distinguishing humans from persons --
Abortion yes, infanticide no --
Critiquing the conventional view --
Is personhood a matter of location? --
What is partial-birth abortion? --
Reconsidering Warren's account --
4. Does personhood begin during pregnancy? --
Conscious desires/interests --
Viability --
Quickening/fetal movement --
Sentience --
Human appearance --
Brain development --
Implantation --
5. Is fetal moral status linked to fetal development? --
The developmental view --
A critique of the developmental view --
The time-relative interest account --
Late-term abortion and early-term abortion --
6. Does personhood begin at conception? --
Are all human beings persons? --
Personhood as endowment or performance? --
Humans are rational animals --When do humans begin to exist? --
The constitutive property argument --
--
The flourishing like ours argument --
The lessons of history. 7. Objections to the basic moral status of human embryos --
The acorn analogy --
Size --
Twinning --
Embryo fusion --
High embryo mortality rate --
Hylomorphism --
Anti-abortion, anti-contraception --
Living human cells are not persons --
Embryo rescue case --
The bag of marbles analogy --
Cost-benefit analysis --
The uncertainty argument --
8. Is it wrong to abort a person? --
The violinist analogy --
The burglar analogy --
The "no worse off" argument --
Critical analysis of the violinist analogy --
The misunderstood Samaritan --
The bodily integrity objection --
The consistency objection --
The intention/foresight objection --
Critical analysis of the burglar analogy --
Special duties to care for children? --
The intimacy defense of abortion --
The comparative burdens objection --
Forcible organ donation --
The right to control your own body --
Does killing make a human being "worse off"? --
9. Hard cases for critics of abortion --
Difficult circumstances --
Fetal deformity --
Abortion for the child's good --
Cases of rape and incest --
Abortion is safer than childbirth --
Abortion to save the mother's life --
The right to self-defense and double effect reasoning --
Ectopic pregnancy --
The hysterectomy case --
The craniotomy case --
10. Hard cases for defenders of abortion --
Murder of pregnant women --
Sex selection abortion --
Abortion for frivolous reasons --
Safe, legal, but why rare? --
Why personal opposition? --
Prenatal bonding with "our baby" --
11. Abortion and conscience protections --
Conscience and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists --
The incompatibility thesis --
Discrimination and conscientious objection --
The rights and autonomy of patients --
A duty to refer? --
Respect for humanity --
Protection for institutions --
Conscience as a justification for abortion --
12. Could artificial wombs end the abortion debate? --
Artificial wombs and ardent defenders of abortion --
Artificial wombs and ardent critics of abortion --
The artificiality objection --
The IVF objection --
The deprivation of maternal shelter objection --
The wrongful experimentation objection --
The pro-life case for artificial wombs --
An end to the abortion debate? --
Appendix : the myth of the child as vampire.
Series Title: Routledge annals of bioethics.
Responsibility: Christopher Kaczor.

Abstract:

"Appealing to reason rather than religious belief, this book is the most comprehensive case against the choice of abortion yet published. This updated edition of The Ethics of Abortion critically evaluates all the major grounds for denying fetal personhood, including the views of those who defend not only abortion but also post-birth abortion. It also provides several (non-theological) justifications for the conclusion that all human beings, including those in utero, should be respected as persons. This book also critiques the view that abortion is not wrong even if the human fetus is a person. The Ethics of Abortion examines hard cases for those who are prolife, such as abortion in cases of rape or in order to save the mother's life, as well as hard cases for defenders of abortion, such as sex selection abortion and the rationale for being "personally opposed" but publically supportive of abortion. It concludes with a discussion of whether artificial wombs might end the abortion debate. Answering the arguments of defenders of abortion, this book provides reasoned justification for the view that all intentional abortions are ethically wrong and that doctors and nurses who object to abortion should not be forced to act against their consciences. Updates and Revisions to the Second Edition include: --A response to Alberto Giubilini's and Francesca Minerva's now famous 2012 article, "After-Birth Abortion" in the Journal of Medical Ethics--Responses to new defenses of Judith Jarvis Thomson's violinist argument--The addition of a new chapter on gradualist views of fetal moral worth, including Jeff McMahan's Time-Relative Interest Account--The addition of a new chapter on the conscience protection for health care workers who are opposed to abortion--Responses to many critiques of the first edition, including those made by Donald Marquis, David DeGrazia, and William E. May"--
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Praise for the First Edition:"This is one of the very best book-length defenses of the claim that abortion is morally impermissible. It is clear, thorough, thoughtful and carefully argued. I would Read more...

 
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